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Sunday, May 17, 2020 | History

4 edition of Language planning in Yugoslavia found in the catalog.

Language planning in Yugoslavia

Language planning in Yugoslavia

  • 331 Want to read
  • 23 Currently reading

Published by Slavica Publishers in Columbus, Ohio .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Yugoslavia,
  • Yugoslavia.
    • Subjects:
    • Language planning -- Yugoslavia.,
    • Yugoslavia -- Languages.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references and index.

      Statementedited by Ranko Bugarski and Celia Hawkesworth.
      ContributionsBugarski, Ranko., Hawkesworth, Celia, 1942-
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsP40.5.L352 Y85 1992
      The Physical Object
      Pagination233 p. :
      Number of Pages233
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1468107M
      ISBN 100893572322
      LC Control Number93129124

      Maspok (after Masovni pokret (Croatian), i.e. Mass movement) or Croatian spring was a nationalistic and a secessionist movement in the Socialist Republic of Croatia, Yugoslavia during the year of The movement demands were initially around exclusion of Serbian language use and the exclusive use of the Croatian language in Croatia, declaration of Croatia as a national state of Croats and.   South Africa is a multi-lingual society that has some unique linguistic problems because of its policy of apartheid. On one level, there are tensions between its two official language groups, Afrikaans and English. On another level, there are linguistic tensions between the ethnic Europeans and the black majority, mostly in regard to language instruction in schools.

      The Market-Planned Economy of Yugoslavia was first published in Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press by:   Yugoslavia was defined by its in-betweenness. Established after the Second World War, the Federal People’s Republic of Yugoslavia may have .

      Former Yugoslavia followed an internationally acclaimed language policy of constitutional and legal equality of its numerous languages. Anticipating or accompanying the disintegration of this federation, the new states arising on its territory published their constitutions in the period – This paper briefly surveys the basic provisions concerning the official use of languages in. The fruit of a landmark international collaboration, this book focuses on the final years of socialist Yugoslavia and on the beginning of the country's breakup. With chapters devoted to each of erstwhile Yugoslavia's six republics, the book also offers a unique blend of thematic essays on political, cultural, economic, environmental, religious.


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Language planning in Yugoslavia Download PDF EPUB FB2

Genre/Form: Kongreß: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Language planning in Yugoslavia. Columbus, Ohio: Slavica Publishers, (OCoLC) Language Planning in Serbia Today Jozhe Toporisic. The Status of Slovene in Yugoslavia Olga Misheska Tomic.

Standard, Dialect, and Register in Macedonian Isa Zymberi. Albanian in Yugoslavia Darko Tanaskovic. The Planning of Turkish as a Minority Language in Yugoslavia Language in the Former Yugoslav Lands.

Introduction. Language has played a crucial role in both the formation and the disintegration of Yugoslavia. The fact that the majority of the inhabitants of the territories now known as Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia and Yugoslavia speak essentially the same language was one of the key factors in the.

Language planning refers to deliberate efforts to affect the structure, function, and acquisition of languages. In education, the most important language planning decisions are about the choice of medium of instruction (Tollefson and Tsui, )—which variety or varieties should be used as the medium (or media) of instruction?In many settings, it is widely assumed that the obvious choice is.

James Tollefson, in his book Planning Language, Planning Inequality, attributes this paradox to the institutional constraints which have been created by dominant groups to prevent linguistic minorities from accessing social and political institutions. In this way inequalities. Following the collapse of the former Yugoslavia, Croatian was declared to be a separate language, distinct from Serbian, and linguistic issues became highly politicized.

This book examines the changing status and norms of the Croatian language and its relationship to Croatian national identity, focusing on the period after Croatian independence. This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

Filipović, Luna and Pütz, Martin Endangered Languages and Languages in Danger. Vol. 42, Issue., p. In Bugarski, R. and Hawkesworth, C. (eds.), Language Planning in Yugoslavia.

On 15th Januaryduring the B. Franolic/Language policy and language planning in Yugoslavia 63 Second World War, the Anti-fascist Council for the National Liberation of Yugoslavia decided by decree (No.

18) that: "All the decrees and edicts will be published in four languages: Serbian, Croatian, Slovenian and Macedonian"'.Cited by: 2. “The book would prove useful for linguistic scholars, particularly those focused on Slavic languages, as it provides a plethora of examples detailing the minutia of linguistic variation, both between Croatian and other former Yugoslav languages (particularly Serbian), as well as between different nationally-recognized, or sanctioned, versions of Croatian throughout varied time periods, or as.

Josip Broz (Serbo-Croatian Cyrillic: Јосип Броз, pronounced [jǒsip brôːz]; 7 May – 4 May ), commonly known as Tito (/ ˈ t iː t oʊ /; Serbo-Croatian Cyrillic: Тито, pronounced), was a Yugoslav communist revolutionary and statesman, serving in various roles from until his death in During World War II, he was the leader of the Partisans, often regarded as Preceded by: Ivan Ribar, (as President of the Presidency.

Planning Language, Planning Inequality: Language Policy in the Community James W. Tollefson, Professor (Emeritus) Department of English James W Tollefson Snippet view - James W. Tollefson No preview available - Yugoslavia fell apart infollowing the collapse of the Soviet Union.

Yugoslavia is now divided into six separate countries: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia, and Slovenia. OCLC Number: Description: pages: maps ; 23 cm. Contents: Introduction / Thomas F. Magner --A sociolinguistic tug of war between language value and language reality in contemporary Slovenian / Joseph Paternost --The sociolinguistics of literary Macedonian / Victor A.

Friedman --An overview of language planning achievements among the Albanians of Yugoslavia / Janet Byron. Yugoslavia: Theory and Practice of Development Planning [G Macesich] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Celia Hawkesworth/Ranko Bugarski (Hg.): Language planning in Yugoslavia. Columbus/Ohio ; New Croatian language planning and its consequences for language attitudes and linguistic behavior - the Istrian case", Language & Communication, A ; I camaleonti istriani.

The idea of a Kosovan language in Yugoslavia’s language politics Article in International Journal of the Sociology of Language () October with 68 Reads How we measure 'reads'. My Cat Yugoslavia by Pajtim Statovci was recommended by Mark. He read it and lent me his copy. He read it and lent me his copy.

His last recommendation was The Last Resort: A Memoir of Mischief and Mayhem on a Family Farm in Africa which was a five-star read/5. The language continuum known as Serbo-Croatian was the most widely spoken language in the former Yugoslavia, at its peak counting as many as 20 million speakers.

The first Cyrillic book, an Orthodox hymnal, was published in Montenegro in Language Planning in Yugoslavia. Columbus, OH: Slavica Publishers. Garry, J. and C. Rubino. InCroatian scholars and writers issued the ‘Declaration Concerning the Name and Status of the Literary Language,’ which called for greater public use of Croatian and, later, the Yugoslav constitutions would allow each republic to identify their own official language.

With the break-up of Yugoslavia in the s, advocacy for a. In conclusion, Language Policies In Education, is a timely, up to date compendium of essays dealing with the topic of language policies and planning in the world.

One drawback though to the book is the lack of essays dealing with China, Russia, and Indonesia, countries with large populations which have in the past and right now are dealing with.

Key words: language politics, language planning, purism, Croatian language, language in former Yugoslavia Introduction 1 The aim of this article is to provide a general and brief overview of some problems concerning the intricate relation of language, ideology, and politics in .Language Policy and Identity: the case of Catalonia HENRY MILLER, University of Aston, Birmingham, United Kingdom KATE MILLER, University of St Andrews, United Kingdom ABSTRACT Language is a crucial feature of national and personal identity.

Where Nationality is contested or controlled a particular language may be.The s disintegration of Yugoslavia was marked by vicious ethnic conflict in several parts of the region.

In this paper, I consider the role of policy towards the Albanian language in promoting.